Problem of Practice Final Report

Introduction

This past school year my school district implemented a 1:1 Chromebook initiative.  As a new employee to the district, I was excited at the many opportunities that a 1:1 teaching environment would provide for my students. However, it seemed that many teachers were uneasy about the new technology plan and nervous about using the devices in general. As the year progressed, the Chromebooks were primarily being used as an online textbook; to take tests, turn in electronic worksheets and papers, and to play review games. Basically, the Chromebooks are being used as a new mode of lesson delivery. Without my experiences in the MAET program, I would be in the same boat as the rest of my staff.  However, I feel that I look at technology use with a different set of lenses than most of my coworkers and believe that technology can be used to provide an entirely different learning experience for our students.  Specifically, the Chromebooks should be used to help promote 21st century skills, but in order for teachers to be able to create lessons that facilitate this goal, they will need additional resources.

Empathize

In order to make connections with a range of teachers, I decided to create a survey that focused primarily on the role of technology in classrooms, technology concerns, teacher interests and teacher preparedness in the use of new technologies.  Here are links to the the survey and the survey summary. Based on my analysis of the survey results, teachers are most concerned with how students are misusing their Chromebooks and the various distractions that this causes. Furthermore, it seems that teachers are primarily using the Chromebooks in order to complete activities that would be similar to what they would have done on paper, rather than creating diverse lessons that enhance 21st century skills in the students. As I further analyzed the data, it seemed that the majority of teachers need more time and resources in order to help them create more relevant, 21st century lessons. In order to further dive into this issue, I asked myself the question “how do we get teachers the appropriate support to enable them to develop 21st century lessons?” This question will further help me to develop a broad range of ideas in the ideate mode. Overall, the empathize mode allowed me to more completely identify with the teacher population on my campus and provided information to not only better define my problem of practice, but also provided a platform to scaffold ideas for a solution that I will use later in the ideate mode.

Define

Based off of my work in the empathize mode I was able to develop a more complete view of the audience in which the problem most significantly impacts. The primary audience includes teachers, however administrators as well as the student population within the school district are also of concern. The knowledge gained through the empathize mode, then helped me to create a more concise problem definition:

“How to provide teachers with opportunities on campus in order to create 21st century lessons, which are enhanced with technology, that both increase student engagement and content mastery.”

As a result of this information, I was able to get a more specific idea as to what I would like to further investigate as potential solutions to the problem.  Primarily, this would include methods that would provide teachers with appropriate professional development opportunities. This is necessary to help build their knowledge bank of technology tools and skills. In addition, to being armed with the necessary resources to incorporate these tools into relevant and engaging lessons for their student populations. The professional development must be relevant to teachers needs and wants in order for them to be willing to dedicate their time and attention toward the opportunities.

Ideate

As a way to brainstorm during the Ideate mode, I met with two other teachers who each had different experiences using technology. The most significant ideas that came from the brainstorm session were not necessarily laid out solutions, but a means to get there. Primarily, we discussed the need for there to be a cultural change on my campus in order to begin to change teachers perceptions about technology use and also to encourage them to develop new skills that will help them create engaging, 21st century lessons for our students. After the brainstorming session, I was left with a lot of great ideas to ponder. I created an Incubation Journal, to continue my thinking throughout the week. Throughout both the brainstorming and incubation processes I was able to develop a wide range ideas that would help me to design a potential solution. Of these, the most impactful idea was the need to change the cultural of my school’s campus in order to promote the effective use of technology. As a result,of this process, I feel that I was well prepared to create a prototype for a solution in the next stage of the design process.

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Summary of Brainstorming Session

Prototype

Armed with fresh ideas from the ideate mode, I was able to develop an initial prototype as a solution to my problem of practice.  The main goal and objective of the prototype was to create a technology integration team amongst a group of classroom teachers who are excited about using technology to transform their teaching in order to better meet the needs of our 21st century student population. This team will share their ideas, strategies and experiences with other teachers on campus in order to increase teacher knowledge and expertise of how to best use technology within the classroom setting. Furthermore, the primary objective would be to enhance lessons with technology in order to increase student engagement and content mastery.

Test

In order to test how my technology integration team might fair on my campus, I decided to interview a group of coworkers. The individuals I chose to interview had a wide range of technology skills, some use technology quite often in their lessons, while others do not. In addition, each were from different content areas. My goal in the interview process was to see what my colleagues thought of my prototype, get any suggestions, and answer a few questions that I still had about the actual implementation of a technology integration team. Before the interview began I drafted several questions based off of my original prototype so that I was able to get more accurate and beneficial feedback about my design. For the most part, the teachers seemed to give positive feedback to the overall format and ideas behind my prototype.  Each teacher said that they would all appreciate any extra help to guide them through using technology within their own lessons. A couple of them were even interested in participating on the team itself. All teachers agreed that we would need administrators to help support and lead in the development of the technology team. We also discussed that it would be beneficial to have a place, such as a website or even a Google Doc to share ideas with both members of the Tech Team as well as with other staff members. Overall, each teacher thought that it was a need on our campus and that it would be feasible to accomplish.

Additionally, I think that there will be several things that I will need to assess before my technology integration team can become a reality. First, I will need to officially meet with administrators to get more specific feedback on how they might be able to support such a technology initiative in terms of time, money, or talents that may be required of them.  I must  as well inquire as to whether or not teachers could get any LPDC credit for their time working on the program. I also want to inquire on the current status of the previous technology team that was in place.  Is it still an active program? Would these individuals also be interested in working on this new initiative? I found the testing process to be helpful as I was able to discuss my prototype with an audience that will most directly be impacted by the technology initiative. Based on my colleagues’ opinions and ideas, I have more information to further refine and revise my prototype.

Conclusion

Throughout the entire design process I have come to the realization that a single problem can be much more complex than initially identified. The empathize and define modes, illustrated this as I learned more about my audience, their specific needs, and the many concerns that were ultimately at the root of my problem of practice. Ideation only furthered this realization in that there are multiple angles to look at the problem, which resulted in developing multiple solution sets. It seemed that many of these ideas could be a potential solution and it was up to me to determine which ideas might lead to the greatest positive impact on campus. My first prototype included the creation of a technology team on campus. It is important for me to recognize that while I think this is a good solution, it is not the only possible solution, and based off of my testing data, I may need to revise the prototype or develop a new one to better suit the needs of my audience.  Through all of this, I have also come to realize that it is imperative throughout the design process to have an empathetic view of the specified audience as I begin to create and develop possible solutions for my problem of practice. I must also be both flexible and creative in order to be a successful designer.  It is important for me to be able to create multiple solution sets that break outside of the norm in order to develop a best possible solution to my problem. Armed with these skills, I am better able to meet the needs of my audience and hopefully provide them with a well laid out plan to solve my identified problem of practice.

Please find a whole list of appendices on my Google Doc.

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Design Thinking and Education

What makes someone a “good designer”? Good designers are able to recognize that the nature of design is human-centered and that  “seeing things from other points of view is a tool for innovation”(Arts Strategies).  As a result of focusing on human-centered design, the designer is able to have a basic understanding of the population’s culture, further placing the problem in better context. With this knowledge, good designers are then able to utilize a design process in order to find the best possible solution to the problem itself. In addition, good designers are capable of thinking of new ways to invoke creativity and imagination. Michael Michalko described in his book “Cracking Creativity”, several examples of how famous artists and scientists, such as Albert Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, and Samuel Morse used their creative minds in a unique way to provoke “Ah-Ha!” moments of ingenuity (Michalko, 2001). As a result of their creative abilities, these individuals made huge impacts on the our culture and society as we know it today. While not everyone will make contributions as significant as these gentlemen, a creative mind is essential in the design process, especially when attempting to solve complex problems. In order to think past these issues, we must be willing to think creatively to discover a possible solution to any problem.

Design Thinking

Over the past semester I have been given the opportunity to dive head first into design thinking. Design thinking is “a methodology for innovation that combines creative and analytical approaches, and requires collaboration across disciplines”(Institute of Design at Stanford). Furthermore, offering a structured approach to help designers focus on finding solutions to complex problems. These problems are not only messy, but also do not necessarily have a “right” answer. Rather, designers are tasked with finding a best possible solution to the problem at hand.  In addition, it is essential for design thinking to focus on a human-centered and empathetic process, as well as encourage innovation and creativity throughout the entire design process.

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The Stanford Design Model

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One such design process is the Stanford Design Model.  This model breaks up the entire design process into five distinct modes.  The first mode focuses on Empathy, which is the cornerstone of a design process that is human-centered. This mode encourages the designer to observe, engage, and immerse themselves within their user population in order to develop a sense of what is most important to the users themselves.  Being able to empathize with the user further allows the designer to determine the needs of the audience in order to create a better solution to the problem. The second mode of the design model, Define, allows the designer time to analyze and dissect the discoveries made during the empathize mode (Institute of Design at Stanford). This allows the designer to focus in on all aspects of the problem and develop a specific problem statement.

The next mode to the Stanford Design Model concentrates on Ideation, which allows time for the user to brainstorm and generate a diverse solution set. This process is centered on exploring any possible solution whether they are feasible or not.  These ideas will then be used directly in the Prototype Mode of the design model. Prototyping is a means of organizing the ideas from your head and ideation sessions and then actually putting them into some sort of physical form (Institute of Design at Stanford). A prototype can take many shapes, for example, it could be a physical product, a storyboard, documented plan, etc. Once a solid prototype has been developed the designer is ready for the Test Mode, which is the last mode of the design model. Testing provides an opportunity to receive feedback and learn more about the intended audience. Furthermore, testing creates an opportunity for the designer to revise and develop a better overall solution.

Design and Education

Within our education system, schools are constantly facing a wide array of challenges, ranging from simple to complex problems.These problems could include lesson designing for increased content mastery, finding funding for professional development opportunities, creating 21st century learning experiences, and differentiating instruction to meet a diverse population of students. Often these issues cannot be easily solved and may require a new perspective in order to solve the problem at hand. This is where design thinking, and models such as the Stanford Design Model, can play a role in helping create feasible solutions to these issues. Design thinking encourages educators to be “intentional and collaborative when designing, and empowers educators to create impactful solutions” (Design Thinking for Educators). An additional resource that provides more insight into the design process specific to many issues in education is The Design Thinking for Educators Model.  This specific model provides a “Toolkit”, which offers a design model similar to the Stanford Design Model, however it focuses on providing educators with an interesting methodology for solving complex issues in education.

Design Thinking in My Classroom

For myself, I see the most practical day-to-day application for the use of design thinking when it comes to lesson design. As a classroom teacher I have the same problems and issues every time I develop a unit or lesson:

How can I develop a relevant and engaging lesson that both meets the learning needs of my diverse student population and facilitates content mastery?

Throughout the semester, I have been given a unique opportunity to analyze each mode of the Stanford Design Model in many different capacities as to how it might relate to my own professional practices. As a result, I have had the opportunity to think about how I might be able to apply each mode of the model to better help me solve this problem of practice.

Perhaps the most significant step is to gain a sense of empathy within my student population. As a teacher, is is essential that I am able to understand my student population. From the broad perspective, I need to be able to determine what motivates students, uncover any individual or class needs, analyze learning habits, in addition to having a basic understanding of the various cultures and backgrounds my students may come from. More specifically, it is important that I have an understanding of student’s’ strengths and weaknesses as both a learner in general and in the specific content that I am introducing at that time. Gaining a more empathetic vision of my student population allows for me to better relate with students, which not only helps me to build a better relationship with them, but also provides me with the opportunity to focus on each student’s specific needs.

With a better understanding of my student population, I am then more capable of defining specific learning goals for individual students, as well as my class as a whole. The define mode provides time to further assess my student population in order to create specific learning goals. The analysis of my empathy findings allows me to better understand the different ability levels of my student population.  However, this stage is unique in that there may actually be several different components to defining learning goals for my entire student population. Specifically, I will create one broad lesson objective, but in reality, not every student may be prepared to meet that objective.  Some students, especially those with learning disabilities, may require a different or modified learning objective based on their Individualized Education Plan, while others may need enrichment opportunities throughout the lesson. It is essential that I am able to define these potential issues of a diverse student population before I am able to begin to create the lesson plan itself.

Continuing with the Stanford Design Model, the Ideation mode, or brainstorming session, provides an opportunity to generate possible solutions to my problem as a whole.  More specifically, I am able to explore possible solutions to problems I may have discovered in the empathize and define modes. In addition, this provides time to begin developing ideas for the implementation of the lesson. For myself, this is where I tend to spend the most of my time. I enjoy researching and creating new ideas for lessons and brainstorming activities with colleagues.  This time often provides me with a variety of lesson ideas.  Often, many of these ideas can be pretty rough and not well developed, while others can be more concrete and focused on lesson objectives. It is important to allow myself the time to develop multiple solution sets, that way I have a broad range of ideas to choose from as I begin to develop my lesson plan and be more able to incorporate the needs of individual students into the lesson design.

Allowing myself adequate time for ideation, I am now armed with a variety of ideas to create a more specific lesson plan, or prototype.  In addition, the information that I gathered in the empathize and define modes are also applied to my overall lesson design. In this creative process, I will be able to refine the ideas and content that I developed in the initial ideation mode in order to create the best possible lesson.  While my ultimate goal here is to create a lesson to teach a specific content, it is important to again recognize that I also have to determine how I can differentiate the instruction to meet every student’s needs.

The last step of the design process requires me to test my lesson design by actually implementing it within my student population. This testing process allows for me to ultimately get feedback on my my student’s individual progress as well as the overall effectiveness of the lesson itself. With the data and feedback that I receive, I am able to learn more about my student population and whether or not they are achieving their learning goals. As a result, I am better able to either design subsequent lessons within the content unit to address misconceptions or provide enrichment opportunities where needed.  In addition, I am able to evaluate what worked in the lesson and what didn’t.  I am then able to use this information to refine or redesign this specific lesson for next year’s class.  Furthermore, analysis and reflection of the overall lesson design can provide a guide for lesson designing throughout the school year in order to continue to better meet the needs of my students and help them to achieve an increased level of content mastery.

In conclusion, design thinking can provide educators with a unique opportunity to solve issues within our communities of practice. Models such as the Stanford Design Model provide a framework for educators to utilize while they tackle these issues. As solutions to these problems are developed it is essential that we continue to place the focus on our student populations, incorporating a human-centered design process.  Additionally, it is equally important to allow time for creativity and ideation to develop innovative solutions to our problems of practice.

 

References:

Arts Strategies. “Empathy Thinking”. Online video clip. YouTube. YouTube, 26 Sept. 2014.   Web. 19 April 2015.                                                                                                                                               Design Thinking for Educators. IDEO Riverdale. n.d. Web. 15 Apr. 2015.                                    Institute of Design at Stanford. d.school Bootcamp Bootleg.  Hasso Plattner                         Institute of Design at Stanford. Stanford University Institute of Design. 2015. Web. 15 Apr. 2015.   Michalko, M. 2001. Cracking Creativity. New York, NY: Crown Publishing Group.

Image Credit:

The Stanford Design Model – http://www.blendmylearning.com/2014/05/28/using-design-thinking-to-develop-personalized-learning-pilots/

The Testing Mode

The Stanford Design Model offers a means to help individuals define a problem and ultimately develop a solution to solve that problem. The model consists of 5 modes; Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype and Test.  In order to better describe the last step of the model, the Test Mode, I created a short video.  The video helps to define the testing mode itself and also describes why it is important to test. In addition, I recently participated in the Test Mode of the design model myself, so I also identify steps that I took in order to test my own prototype and what I learned from the testing process. Please find the video embedded below.

 

Testing the Prototype

testing-testingThis past school year my school district implemented a 1:1 Chromebook initiative.  As the Chromebook “roll-out” was initiated, it seemed that many teachers were uneasy about the new technology plan and nervous about using the devices in general. Their unease stemmed from many reasons such as a lack of general technology skills, skepticism of how the students would take care of the Chromebooks, worried about student misuse of the internet and nervousness about how they would modify their curriculum to be able to use the new technology in their classrooms. It seems that a root cause of this problem stems from the fact that most teachers on campus have not had professional development related to designing engaging lessons with technology. With this issue in mind, the audience for my problem of practice  includes both teachers and administrators as well as the student population within the school district.

As a means to solve this problem of practice, I designed a plan that would create a technology integration team on my campus.  The team would consist of  a group of classroom teachers who are excited about using technology to transform their teaching in order to better meet the needs of our 21st century student population. This team will share ideas, strategies and experiences with other teachers on campus in order to increase teacher knowledge and expertise of how to best use technology within the classroom setting. Furthermore, the primary objective would be to enhance lessons with technology in order to increase student engagement and content mastery.

In order to test how my technology integration team might fair on my campus, I decided to interview a group of coworkers. The individuals I chose to interview had a wide range of technology skills, some use technology quite often in their lessons, while others do not. In addition, each were from different content areas. My goal in the interview process was to see what my colleagues thought of my prototype, get any suggestions, and answer a few questions that I still had about the actual implementation of the technology integration team. Before the interview began I drafted several questions based off of my original prototype so that I was able to get more accurate and beneficial feedback about my design.

As I presented my prototype, the teachers thought the overall goal and objective would work for our campus. The most helpful feedback that I received was input about how our district operates, as I am a new teacher on campus this year.  Specifically, they were able to fill me in on how technology initiatives have worked in the past within the district.  I discovered that we had a technology team in place, but the team’s objectives were different from the ones I had outlined for my technology integration team. Primarily, this team was in place to test out new technologies, like the Chromebooks, and determine which technologies our campus would benefit most from using or purchasing. Another important fact that the teachers brought up was the issue of funding. Currently, my district provides minimal to no funding for extra or outside professional development opportunities.  Which would additionally make it difficult to get any substitutes for these types of opportunities. A suggestion that my interview team made, was to ask our administrators if any of the time put into developing and maintaining a technology integration team could go towards our required LPDC (Individual Professional Development Plan) hours that are required by the state. This would help teachers to be more willing to dedicate time to being active participants of the team.

For the most part, the teachers seemed to give positive feedback to the overall format and ideas behind my prototype.  Each teacher said that they would all appreciate any extra help to guide them through using technology within their own lessons. A couple of them were even interested in participating on the team itself. All teachers agreed that we would need administrators to help support and lead in the development of the technology team. We also discussed that it would be beneficial to have a place, such as a website or even Google Doc to share ideas with both members of the Tech Team as well as with other staff members. Overall, each teacher thought that it was a need on our campus and that it would be feasible to accomplish.

As a result of feedback from my teacher panel, I think that there will be several things that I will need to assess before my technology integration team can become a reality. First, I will need to officially meet with administrators to get more specific feedback on how they might be to support such a technology initiative in terms of time, money or talents that may be required of them.  As well as inquire on whether or not teachers could get any LPDC credit for their time working on the program. I also want to inquire on the current status of the previous technology team that was in place.  Is it still an active program? Would these individuals also be interested in working on this new initiative?

I found the testing process to be helpful as I was able to discuss my prototype with an audience that will most directly be impacted by the technology initiative. Based on my colleagues opinions and ideas, I have more information to further refine and revise my prototype.

 

Image Credit:

“Testing” – https://www.freelancer.com/u/tgotes.html

Prototype Created

Goals & Objectives: To create a technology integration team amongst a group of classroom teachers who are excited about using technology to transform their teaching in order to better meet the needs of our 21st century student population. This team will share their ideas, strategies and experiences with other teachers on campus in order to increase teacher knowledge and expertise of how to best use technology within the classroom setting. Furthermore, the primary objective would be to enhance lessons with technology in order to increase student engagement and content mastery.Green-Action-Plan-2010-1

1. Create Technology Integration Team

Team should consist of the following individuals:

-at least one person from each grade level

-at least one person from each content area

Representatives should either:

-already be using technology in their classrooms

and/or

– have a desire to learn more about technology integration practices

-be comfortable sharing their ideas and information with other staff members

2. Members of the technology integration team should be provided:

Additional opportunities for professional development.

Time to brainstorm, reflect and create technology lessons.

3. Administration should support the following:

Opportunities for teachers to shadow one another to see first hand how technology is being used in other classrooms.

Sharing opportunities in staff meeting and other district led professional development.

Using the tools themselves in staff meeting and other district led professional development.

Without realizing it, I had already been developing my prototype over the last few weeks.  A great deal of the ideation process allowed me time to develop various ideas for a possible solution to my problem of practice. Most of the ideas were rough, but they allowed me to easily refine my notes into a concise professional development plan to help further change the culture on campus by introducing technology integration teams. From the beginning of the design process the main solution that I was thinking of related to developing a technology team, but I did not know how I wanted to incorporate this on my campus. Brainstorming with others helped me to broaden my own ideas, so that when I sat down to create a more formal prototype I was able to reflect on and process the notes from the brainstorming session.  In the end, I hope that my plan will develop several technology leaders on campus, and help to broaden the overall technology literacy of the entire staff. This will be important to achieve the ultimate goal of providing students with additional opportunities for engagement and content mastery through technology use.

Image Credit: http://cohort21.com/kylecardinale/2015/01/23/go-go-action-plan/

Prototyping: “Our Connected World”

3034.prototyping.png-550x0My task this week was to create a prototype out of various household items that represents a big idea in our society.  The idea that resonated the most with me was “Our Connected World”.  Right away I began to make a mental list about what household items I could possibly use to create my prototype. My son has a closet full of craft supplies, so that was my first visit.  I found several useful items and selected play-doh, pipe cleaners, and mod podge to begin with.  I really didn’t know what I was going to do with them, but they seemed like they could be useful.  When I had the products in front of me, my first thought was to use the play-doh to make a world and I could represent the “connecting” theme with the pipe cleaners.  At that point I then decided that I wanted to show how individuals were connected to the world.  I went back through my house and found more of my son’s toys as inspiration in the form of Captain Hook, Donald Duck, Woody and Elmo. They would represent various individuals from around the world.

To show how the specific individuals are connected, I used the pipe cleaners to attach all the figures to the world.  As I did this, I decided that my prototype did not yet depict “how” the world was connected.  After a little thought, I made the decision to use the play-doh again to sculpt several pieces of media including a laptop, a cell phone, a television and a book. I then placed each piece of media in between all the connecting pieces to represent the idea that we are connected world-wide by these various forms of media.  Please view a video that gives you a quick view of my creation.

As you can see through my thought process, when I began prototyping I only had a superficial idea as to how I was going to get my thoughts across.  Actually, I didn’t really know quite what I wanted to say yet.  However, as I began building and sculpting the pieces seemed to fit together in my head and I continued to expand on my original idea.  I needed the time to begin to create my product in order to better develop my original design.  In the end, I feel like I have a product that represents the original theme “our connected world”.

Image Credit: Prototype it –  http://blogs.msdn.com/b/queensland_microsoft_innovation_centre/archive/2013/10/01/prototype-your-app-idea-join-the-workshop.aspx

 

Ideate

BRAINSTORMING

brainstorm1The first step for further developing ideas and solutions for my problem of practice was to have a good ole’ fashioned brainstorming session. The “Ideate Mode” outlined by the Stanford Model of Design thinking suggests that it is important to “explore a wide solution space” in order to begin developing solutions to a problem.  With that, I sat down with a couple other educators to begin a brainstorm session.  I first explained to them my problem of practice: How to develop teacher expertise to best utilize  technology in order to enhance lessons and student engagement within the classroom setting. Neither teacher works on my campus, but they both have had various experiences with my school and a good understanding of the school culture in general. In order to help further frame my problem of practice I reviewed with each of them my survey results that I complied throughout the Empathy Mode of the design process. Once each of us were on the same page, we took some time to brainstorm independently and then discussed our thoughts all together to get a better picture of possible solution.  The pictures below depict individual teacher brainstorm notes as well as our collective thoughts after a successful brainstorm time.

Teacher 1 Brainstorm Notes

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Teacher 2 Brainstorm NotesBrandon
My Brainstorm Notes

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Our Collective Conclusions

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The most significant ideas that came from the brainstorm session were not necessarily laid out solutions, but a means to get there. Primarily, we discussed the need for there to be a Cultural Change on campus in order to begin to change teachers perceptions about technology use and also encourage them to develop new skills that will help them create engaging, 21st century lessons for our students.

 

Incubation

After our brainstorming session, I was left with a lot of great ideas to ponder.  I created an Incubation Journal, which you can view in the video below,  to continue my thinking throughout the week. In addition to a physical journal, I updated my “Ed Tech” Pinterest board anytime I saw a pin that stood out to me and might relate to my problem of practice.

 

Reflection

The deliberateness of the “Incubation Process” seemed a bit difficult for me.  I found that I had to be intentional in stopping what I was doing in order to write down an idea when one popped into my head throughout the week.  I felt that I was as I was busy with other tasks throughout the school day or at home, which resulted in the fact that I was not thinking much about my problem of practice. In addition to the actual journal, which you viewed above, I also updated my “Ed Tech” Pinterest board throughout the week. I found it much easier to spot relevant topics here, as I am in my leisure time when I am able to view my Pinterest feed.  It seemed that I was able to connect more easily with the ideas of my problem of practice in this medium because my mind was clear and at rest.

Throughout both the brainstorming and incubation processes I was able to develop a variety of ideas. Of these, the most impactful idea was to create a cultural change on campus in order to promote the effective use of technology. With this, I will look into the possibility of creating technology teams on campus that will be able to lead by example and share their ideas.  I think these tech teams could take many different forms.  As we move into the Prototype mode next week, I would like to create some specific plans of what a tech team might actually look like on my campus. With that being said, I feel that after digging deep while brainstorming and incubating ideas this week, I will be well prepared for creating prototypes in order to help solve my problem of practice in the next stage of the design process.

Image credits:

Brainstorming Session- http://www.erepublik.com/en/article/brainstorming-session-win-gold–2262973/1/20